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Posts tagged ‘Better Sleep’

BedInABox.com Earns Skin Friendly Certification for CoolRest Gel® Memory Foam Mattresses

BedInABox.com earns Hohenstein Institute Skin Friendly Certification

BedInABox.com earns Hohenstein Institute Skin Friendly Certification

BedInABox.com Earns Skin Friendly Certification for CoolRest Gel® Memory Foam Mattresses

Burlington, NC, June 4, 2015— Hohenstein Institute announces that BedInABox.com, the US manufacturer and Internet retailer of high quality, technologically advanced memory foam mattresses, has been awarded Hohenstein’s Skin Friendly quality label. BedInABox.com’s CoolRest Gel® memory foam mattresses have been extensively tested to confirm that they do not harm skin cells in ways that could lead to discomfort and interrupted sleep.

“People spend about 1/3 of their lives in bed,” says Matt Burgess, Sr. Vice President, BedinaBox.com. “We want our products to help make that time relaxing and restorative. We invest extensively in our CoolRest Gel® memory foam mattresses to guarantee that they are comfortable and provide peaceful rest for the entire family.”

Hohenstein’s Skin Friendly quality label calls for products to be tested for interactions with live human skin cells. Samples undergo a series of evaluations to determine whether contact with skin cells damages them in ways that could result in skin irritation and discomfort. BedInABox.com’s CoolRest Gel® memory foam mattresses were analyzed and found to meet Hohenstein’s stringent criteria for being biocompatible with and non-irritating to skin cells.

In addition to being skin friendly, BedInABox.com’s CoolRest Gel® memory foam mattresses are designed to relieve pressure points, dissipate body heat, and recover their shape quickly. BedInABox.com is also committed to improving the environmental impact of its memory foam by further decreasing the percentage of petroleum based raw materials used in the manufacturing process. CoolRest Gel® memory foam is manufactured in the USA.

“BedInABox.com clearly takes the health and well-being of every customer very seriously,” says Dr. Sam Moore, managing director of Hohenstein Institute America. “They establish comprehensive quality standards for their CoolRest Gel® memory foam mattresses then test them thoroughly to confirm that every requirement is met.”

More information about Hohenstein’s skin sensory testing and certification services is available on Hohenstein’s website or by emailing Dr. Moore at Hohenstein Institute America. S.Moore@Hohenstein.com.

Speaking and Snoozing Don’t Mix

Have you ever been awoken by your sleep partner muttering in their sleep? If so, they likely suffer from sleep talking.

Sleep talking, also known as somniloquy, is a sleep disorder characterized by frequent attempts at talking during sleep. This disorder can feature anything from slight mumbles to elaborate conversations. If you or a loved one suffer from this unique sleep disorder, it is important to understand how it may affect others and what you can do to combat its side-effects.

Just as there are variances in volume and complexity, there are also variances in frequency of sleep talking episodes and severity of sleep disruption. While sleep talking is oftentimes hereditary, episodes are often brought on from sleep disrupting behaviors such as alcohol consumption, fever, stress, depression and sleep deprivation. Most people will never realize that they suffer from episodes of sleep talking, but many others may be affected.

There is typically not a serious need to have sleep talking treated, however, it can be an indication of other serious sleep disorders that can be harmful down the road. The best way to lower the likelihood of a sleep talking episode is by avoiding activities that harm the sleep cycle such as alcohol consumption and sleep deprivation.

If you can’t seem to keep your thoughts to yourself while sleeping, be sure to ask your doctor if there may be more serious issues at hand.

“Sleep Talking.” – National Sleep Foundation. Web. 19 Nov. 2014. <http://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/sleep-talking&gt;.

Problems with Pets and Sleep

Who doesn’t love snuggling up to a fluffy dog or cat? While it is a well-known fact that owning pets can be beneficial to their owners’ health, sleeping with these furry friends can actually be quite harmful and make it difficult to get your best night’s sleep.

A recent APPA study found that more than half of dogs and cats sleep with their adult owners. That is a lot a pet hair getting caught in between the sheets.

Those with allergies to pet dander will find themselves much happier whenever they find an alternative spot for their furry friends to rest for the night. Most people will benefit from giving their sinuses a break from the strain of hair saturated air, but hypoallergenic pets can make this process less stressful.

Obviously, sleeping with pets increases the opportunity to have your sleep disturbed by an animal’s movement and natural disruptions in their own sleep cycles – after all, we can’t assume our sleep cycle is the same as our pet’s sleep cycle. Many animals experience a more active REM stage of sleep, which often times results in restless leg movements, growling or barking, and sudden waking. Some pets, especially dogs with a history of more aggressive behavior, may become more protective at night, especially when sleeping with their owner. Therefore, understanding your pets behaviors is an important factor when choosing whether or not you should be snuggling up with your pet pals.

Getting pets out of the bedroom once they have become accustomed to sleeping with you is a much more difficult problem than washing out pet hair. Most vets believe that pets should be kept out of the bedroom altogether if you don’t intend on them sleeping with you. Training dogs to stay off the bed is typically easier than with cats, but either animal can pose a challenge, especially when you are trying to get them to stay in the same room, but not on the actual bed.

Overall, it is important to understand both you and your pet’s sleep preferences and behaviors before making long-term decisions that can influence behavior and become habit.

http://pets.webmd.com/features/pets-in-your-bed

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/russell-rosenberg-phd/sleeping-with-pets_b_2008808.html

Smart Sleeping: How Sleep Powers Your Brain

Feeling less sharp after missing sleep is not all in your head… well, actually it is.

Studies have shown that lack of sleep is a huge contributor to lessened brain power and even declining brain size. During REM sleep, the brain becomes energized to the point that dreams occur. This stage of sleep is vital to rejuvenating the brain and repairing brain cells. Although it is recommended that individuals get a solid eight hours of sleep, naps are also beneficial to strengthening the brain and remaining alert during waking hours.

Failing to get enough sleep can be detrimental to your health and brain processes. It is even thought that sleep disorders contributing to lack of adequate sleep can result in Alzheimer’s and dementia, and, in the short term, makes it much more difficult to learn and retain new information. Although many people are aware of the damage to the body and mind that results from lack of sleep, sleep deprivation continues to be an issue, especially among students and young professionals.

Lack of sleep is horrible for your entire body so it is vital to give your mind and body the rest it needs. Sleep is also an important contributor to parts of the brain that influence growth, social interaction and emotional reactions. While you may only view sleep as a time to rest your brain, you are actually exercising it by allowing it to act in a way and produce chemicals it doesn’t have the ability to while the body is awake. Not only does lack of sleep hurt your brain, your brain cannot produce sleep inducing chemicals if you don’t go through the entire sleep cycle that occurs upon a full night’s sleep.

Give your brain a break and make sure to get adequate sleep to ensure a happy, healthy noggin.

 

“Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep.” : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). 25 July 2014. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brain_basics/understanding_sleep.htm&gt;.

Haiken, Melanie. “Lack Of Sleep Kills Brain Cells, New Study Shows.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, 20 Mar. 2014. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.forbes.com/sites/melaniehaiken/2014/03/20/lack-of-sleep-kills-brain-cells-new-study-suggests/&gt;.

Willingham, Val. “Lack of Sleep May Shrink Your Brain.” CNN. Cable News Network, 1 Jan. 1970. Web. 17 Sept. 2014. <http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/04/health/no-sleep-brain-size/&gt;.